BDATA

BIODIVERSITY DATA

EWT: Carnivore Conservation Programme Cheetah Tracking Data

Latest version published by Endangered Wildlife Trust on Nov 3, 2017 Endangered Wildlife Trust

In partnership with the University of Pretoria, The Endangered Wildlife Trust’s (EWT) Carnivore Conservation Programme collared nine free-roaming Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in the Thabazimbi area in Limpopo Province, South Africa. This study was undertaken to determine the spatial ecology of free-roaming Cheetahs and how they utilize areas that lack larger, competing predators such as Lions and Spotted Hyenas. The data were collected between September 2003 and November 2008; resulting in a total of 3165 location points for nine individual Cheetahs.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 3,165 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 3,165 records in English (77 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
Metadata as an EML file download in English (12 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (12 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Marnewick K, Page-Nicolson S, Roxburgh L, Somers M (2016): EWT: Carnivore Conservation Programme Cheetah Tracking Data. v1.1. Endangered Wildlife Trust. Dataset/Occurrence. http://ipt.sanbi.org.za/iptsanbi/resource?r=cheetahtrackingdata&v=1.1

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Endangered Wildlife Trust. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 77b04b75-97f5-4d3c-9184-8cc5c12d71ae.  Endangered Wildlife Trust publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by South African Biodiversity Information Facility.

Keywords

Occurrence; Observation

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Kelly Marnewick
Carnivore Conservation Programme Manager
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA
Samantha Page-Nicolson
Science Officer
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA
Lizanne Roxburgh
Senior Scientist
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA
Michael Somers
University of Pretoria ZA

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Kelly Marnewick
Carnivore Conservation Programme Manager
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA

Who filled in the metadata:

Lizanne Roxburgh
Senior Scientist
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA

Who else was associated with the resource:

Custodian Steward
Lizanne Roxburgh
Senior Scientist
Endangered Wildlife Trust ZA

Geographic Coverage

Limpopo and North West provinces of South Africa

Bounding Coordinates South West [-27.66, 22.43], North East [-21.65, 29.34]

Taxonomic Coverage

The dataset covers a single species, namely the Cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus

Species  Acinonyx jubatus (Cheetah)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2003-09-18 / 2008-11-21

Project Data

No Description available

Title Conservation biology of cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus (Schreber, 1775) and African wild dogs Lycaon pictus (Temminck, 1820) in South Africa.
Funding Columbus Zoo, Cat Life Foundation, Duemke Family Trust, Scovill Zoo, Carston Springs Trust and the DST-NRF Centre for Excellence for Invasion Biology

The personnel involved in the project:

Principal Investigator
Kelly Marnewick
Principal Investigator
Michael Somers

Sampling Methods

Cheetahs were trapped using double door traps (described in Marnewick 2015; Marnewick & Celliers 2006). Trapped Cheetahs were immobilised by a professional wildlife veterinarian and fitted with tracking collars. In instances where coalitions were caught (i.e. George and Joss), only one member of the coalition or group was fitted with a tracking collar. Cheetahs were allowed to recover from immobilisation in the trap cage and were released at the site of capture. Cheetahs were monitored for the extent of their life or the life of the collar. All activities involving Cheetah handling and research were done under the guidance of the University of Pretoria Animal Use and Care committee (reference number: EC030-09) and with permits issued by Limpopo Economic Development Environment and Tourism department (the local conservation authority). Cheetahs were monitored for between 28 and 2 119 days, depending on the life of the Cheetah or the collar. Initially, VHF collars (African Wildlife Tracking, Pretoria, South Africa) were fitted to two individuals. Later in the study, these were replaced by GPS/GSM collars (African Wildlife Tracking, Pretoria, South Africa & Hot Group, Pretoria, South Africa) which were utilized to obtain more frequent and more accurate data. Two collars needed to be replaced as a result of deteriorating batteries. In these instances, the Cheetahs were immobilised from a helicopter. The two male (AM196 - GeorgeJoss) and three male (AS68 - CBU) coalitions were initially monitored using VHF collars resulting in 56 (2.8% of total) and 12 (8.6% of total) data points being obtained respectively.

Study Extent The study covers two provinces within South Africa; the Limpopo Province and the North-West Province, where a free-roaming population of Cheetah occurs. Most data points (> 95%) occur in Limpopo; typically around the town of Thabazimbi located in the western reaches of the province. Some of the points (< 5 %) occur in the northern areas of the North-West Province.
Quality Control The dataset has gone through a cleaning and georeferencing verification process to ensure GPS points and accompanying location information is correct.

Method step description:

  1. Locations for animals wearing VHF collars were recorded by tracking the individuals from a microlight aircraft with one pilot and one researcher on board. For GPS/ GSM collars, all GPS fixes were recorded directly from the device and transmitted through cell phone towers. This data was then accessed and downloaded through an online platform. The GPS/ GSM devices were set to take either two or four locations per day (at 12h00 and 00h00 for the collars set for two daily locations and additional times of 06h00 and 18h00 for collars with four daily locations).

Additional Metadata

Papers published from the dataset: Marnewick K, Ferreira SM, Grange S, Watermeyer J, Maputla N, et al. 2014. Evaluating the Status of African Wild Dogs Lycaon pictus and Cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus through Tourist-based Photographic Surveys in the Kruger National Park. PLoS ONE 9(1): e86265. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086265. Marnewick, K. & Cilliers, D. 2006. Range use of two coalitions of male cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in the Thabazimbi district of the Limpopo province, South Africa. South African Journal of Wildlife Research 36(2): 147-151. Marnewick, K., Cilliers, D., Hayward, M. & Somers, M. 2009. Survival of cheetahs relocated from ranchlands to fenced protected areas. In: Hayward, M & Somers, M. (Eds.) The re-introduction of top order predators, chapter 13. Blackwell Publishing. Marnewick, K. & Somers, M.J. 2015. Home range size of cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus outside protected areas in South Africa. African Journal of Wildlife Research 45(2): 223–232. Marnewick, K. 2015. Conservation biology of cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus (Schreber, 1775) and African wild dogs Lycaon pictus (Temminck, 1820) in South Africa. Phd. University of Pretoria.

Purpose The aim of this study (in the form of a Doctoral thesis - Marnewick 2015), was to determine, through satellite tracking, how free-roaming Cheetahs utilize utilize areas that lack larger, competing predators such as Lions (Panthera leo) and Spotted Hyenas (Crocuta crocuta. The current dataset is held at the Endangered Wildlife Trust.
Alternative Identifiers 77b04b75-97f5-4d3c-9184-8cc5c12d71ae
http://ipt.sanbi.org.za/iptsanbi/resource?r=cheetahtrackingdata