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BIODIVERSITY DATA

FBIP: Molecular signatures to define members of the actinobacterial family Streptosporangiaceae

Latest version published by South African National Biodiversity Institute on Jun 28, 2019 South African National Biodiversity Institute

The project will generate more than 100 nearly-full-length gene sequences (and associated amino acid sequences) from strains in the family Streptosporangiaceae for each of the three target genes. The intention is to generate a genus-specific barcode for each of the 13 genera, as well as a family-specific barcode for each of the three genes.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 122 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

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Data as a DwC-A file download 122 records in English (7 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
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Metadata as an RTF file download in English (11 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Meyers P (2019): FBIP: Molecular signatures to define members of the actinobacterial family Streptosporangiaceae. v1.0. South African National Biodiversity Institute. Dataset/Occurrence. http://ipt.sanbi.org.za/iptsanbi/resource?r=molecular&v=1.0

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is South African National Biodiversity Institute. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 9ffa8eaa-191a-48bf-82f3-2f9cdfa7baa4.  South African National Biodiversity Institute publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by South African Biodiversity Information Facility.

Keywords

Molecular signatures; gyrB; gyrase subunit B; recA; recombinase A; inteins; Specimen

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Paul Meyers
Senior Lecturer
University of Cape Town University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3 7701 Cape Town Western Cape ZA 0216503261
http://www.mcb.uct.ac.za/mcb/people/staff/academic/meyers

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Paul Meyers
Senior Lecturer
University of Cape Town University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3 7701 Cape Town Western Cape ZA 0216503261
http://www.mcb.uct.ac.za/mcb/people/staff/academic/meyers

Who filled in the metadata:

Paul Meyers
Senior Lecturer
University of Cape Town University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3 7701 Cape Town Western Cape ZA 0216503261
http://www.mcb.uct.ac.za/mcb/people/staff/academic/meyers

Who else was associated with the resource:

Content Provider
Paul Meyers
Senior Lecturer
University of Cape Town University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3 7701 Cape Town Western Cape ZA 0216503261
http://www.mcb.uct.ac.za/mcb/people/staff/academic/meyers

Geographic Coverage

Global

Bounding Coordinates South West [-52.483, -170.859], North East [79.432, -165.234]

Taxonomic Coverage

All specimen identified to Species level

Family  Streptosporangiaceae (Bacteria)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2006-06-30 / 2017-06-30

Project Data

The project will generate more than 100 nearly-full-length gene sequences (and associated amino acid sequences) from strains in the family Streptosporangiaceae for each of the three target genes. The intention is to generate a genus-specific barcode for each of the 13 genera, as well as a family-specific barcode for each of the three genes.

Title Molecular signatures to define members of the actinobacterial family Streptosporangiaceae
Identifier IBSG13051318133
Funding Funding from Foundational Biodiversity Information Programme (FBIP)
Study Area Description Global coverage

The personnel involved in the project:

Principal Investigator
Paul Meyers

Sampling Methods

All the actinobacterial type strains were purchased from international culture collections, except the type strain of Nonomuraea candida, which was isolated by us (REFERENCE: Le Roes, M. and Meyers, P. R. (2008) Nonomuraea candida sp. nov., a new species from South African soil. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek; 93: 133-139).

Study Extent Global coverage

Method step description:

  1. What will be done DNA sequences will be obtained from the recA, rpoB and relA genes for each type strain in the family treptosporangiaceae and also for several non-type strains. Amino acid sequences will be obtained by in silico translation of the gene sequences. For each protein, the amino acid sequences for all strains in each genus will be aligned and the alignment will be used to define a consensus amino-acid sequence for that protein for each genus (positions with variable amino acids will be designated as X). The resulting consensus amino acid sequences for each gene for the 13 genera will then be aligned and this alignment will be inspected for amino acids that are unique to each genus (genusspecific amino acid indels and amino acid sequences). These unique indels and/or sequences will be designated as signature amino acids for that genus. The identified molecular signatures will serve as amino-acid barcodes for each genus. Furthermore, for each protein, the alignment of consensus amino acid sequences for the 13 genera will also be used to define a consensus sequence for that protein for the family Streptosporangiaceae (i.e. a sequence showing the amino acids common to all strains of all genera in the family and therefore serving as a barcode for that protein for the family). Should any of the chosen genes prove to be unsuitable in distinguishing between genera in the family Streptosporangiaceae, there are several other genes that have been identified in the published literature as being potentially useful in bacterial taxonomy. Possible alternative genes are atpD, trpB and wblA. Method and approach The strains in the family Streptosporangiaceae will be grown under conditions (growth medium and temperature) that favour the production of a large amount of cell mass. Genomic DNA will be isolated from each strain using a well-established method that provides high DNA concentrations. The DNA will be stored at -20°C. PCR primers will be designed that will allow each gene (recA, rpoB and relA) to be amplified in two or more overlapping sections using Taq DNA polymerase. PCR-amplified fragments will be sequenced by Sanger sequencing and the sequences will be assembled into a single consensus sequence for each gene for each strain. Two sequences for each section of each gene will be obtained: one sequence from each of two different amplicons covering that section of the gene, so as to be able to identify and correct any Taqinduced sequencing errors. We will obtain sequences for each gene from each member of every genus in the family. For the multi-species genera (10 genera), we will initially obtain sequences from three to five phylogenetically distinct type strains in the genus (phylogenetic distinctiveness will be determined based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene trees). This will allow us to assess whether each gene generates phylogenetic trees in which strains from the same genus form a group that is separated from the strains of other genera. We will also look for early indications of amino acid indels and/or signatures that distinguish the genera from each other. If the early results are positive for a particular gene, we will then proceed to obtain the sequences for that gene from all members of the family Streptosporangiaceae. If any gene is shown to have similar sequences between genera, it is unlikely that that gene will be taxonomically useful (as genera cannot be easily distinguished from each other based on sequences of this gene). In this case, we will substitute the unsuitable gene for another gene.

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.sanbi.org.za/iptsanbi/resource?r=molecular